Blog Archives

Weird of the Day: “Wayfaring Strangers: Darkscorch Canticles” collects Dungeons & Dragons-inspired rock from the ’70s

Darkscorch

Some music scenes never quite produced any one band talented enough or weird enough to make it onto our Weird List—but taken collectively, they deserve a shout-out nonetheless. Such a scene was the weird world of ’70s fantasy psych-rock. You wouldn’t think that many bands would’ve been inspired to write heavy rock jams based on their favorite Lord of the Rings and Dungeons & Dragons characters. But apparently back around 1975 or so, a lot of kids were rolling 20-sided dice in their basements to the strains of King Crimson and Black Sabbath. So many, in fact, that ace reissue label the Numero Group has managed to put together a compilation featuring 16 such bands.

Numero Group’s collection of D&D stoner rock is called Wayfaring Strangers: Darkscorch Canticles and features such forgotten heroes of the underground as Triton Warrior, Gorgon Medusa and Stonehenge (yes, there is actually a band on this comp called Stonehenge—Spinal Tap, eat your heart out). Individually, none of the tracks is all that, but taken collectively, it’s a pretty incredible snapshot of a very specific moment in suburban rec room culture. Never again before or since have some many American teenagers simultaneously owned copies of The Dungeon Master’s Guide, the Lord of the Rings trilogy and Jethro Tull’s Minstrel in the Gallery. (Actually, many of the compilation’s tracks pre-date the advent of Dungeons & Dragons and Jethro Tull’s heyday by several years—so many it’s more accurate to say that Darkscorch Canticles reveals that the roots of ’70s rec room culture and British prog-rock in the music of hippie bands who were reading J.R.R. Tolkien on acid.)

To hear clips and order up a copy of Darkscorch Canticles, visit the Numero Group website. And if you really get obsessed with this stuff, there’s even an accompanying board game. Now here’s some Stonehenge.

About these ads

Weird of the Day: Los Doggies, “Pari Passu”

Los Doggies

Los Doggies are an “indie prog” band from Upstate New York who make music that’s simultaneously poppy and full of music-nerd plays on harmonic theory and whatnot. (I say “whatnot” because I know next to nothing about music theory, but I believe “whatnot” is a technical term meaning “stuff jam bands do”). Their drummer Evan sent us a bunch of tracks last night, our favorite of which is this video treatment for Los Doggies’ version of a sexytime song, “Pari Passu.” I say “version of” because…well, you’ll see. Most sex songs don’t contain references to cephalopods and philtrums. (Or is the plural philtra? Philtrae? I bet the Los Doggies guys know. They seem like smarties.)

“Pari Passu” is from the band’s latest album, e’rebody, which you can hear and obtain via Bandcamp.

Pryapisme to release 8-bit EP “Blastbit Rococollider” on limited-edition pink cassette tapes

Pryapisme3

French Nintendocore rockers Pryapisme must love the ’80s. Not only are they releasing a new limited-edition EP only on pink cassette tape, they’re filling entirely with 8-bit music—you know, that tinny, lo-fi electronic stuff that sounds like two Atari 2600′s getting freaky. It’s called Blastbit Rococollider and appears to contain 8-bit remixes/remakes of tracks from their first two albums, Hyperblast Super Collider and Rococo Holocaust. They’re only making 100 copies, but if I can get my hands on one, I plan to break out my old canary-yellow Sport Walkman and make it the soundtrack to a weekend-long binge-playing session on my Asteroids emulator. Don’t judge me.

Here’s the track list for Blastbit Rococollider, which comes out Feb. 3rd on Apathia Records. To (attempt to) order a copy, keep an eye on the Apathia website.

World A :
Level 1 : Quenelle quenelle fourrure (Intro)
Level 2 : La notion de chiralité de spin et d’oscillation de saveur des particules supersymetriques définissant un champs scalaire lors d’une transition de conifold en cosmologie branaire dans un modèle ekpyrotique (Scrolling map)
Level 3 : Lesbian bordello (Warp zone)

World B :
Level 4 : Un druide est giboyeux lorsqu’il se prend pour un neutrino ( Platform )
Level 5 : Darkness lobotomy insurrection (Final boss)
Level 6 : Sanglié par un cornid (Bonus stage)

Maynard James Keenan is even sicker than you are of waiting for Tool’s new album

Maynard James Keenan

So I guess the title of the last Tool album, 10,000 Days, was a guesstimate of how long it would be before they put another album out. Seven years later, we’re still waiting. Was it something we said, guys?

Now even Maynard James Keenan is expressing his impatience with his perfectionist bandmates. “I wait for them to bring music to me,” he recently explained in a Rolling Stone interview. “They tend to go back over and over stuff. It’s a long process. For a person like me, it can be a very tedious process.”

In the same interview, he added, “You can only help support their talent so long. They don’t have to go through it 700 times. They can trust that first thought. But that’s their process, so you gotta let them do it.” I think we can all agree that the subtext of this statement is clearly, Fuck your process! Let’s put out another record! But kudos to Maynard for being at least somewhat diplomatic about his foot-dragging cohorts.

You can read more of the Rolling Stone interview here, but if you’re a big Tool fan, I must warn you, it’ll probably just bum you out. But then, you already knew it sometimes sucks to be a Tool fan, right?

a.P.A.t.T.

a.P.A.t.T.

This week’s weird band was suggested by an excellently named reader called Adam Whybray. He describes a.P.A.t.T. as sounding “a bit like a glitchy Mr. Bungle cult that formed down the pub.” And while that’s probably as good a description as any of these cheeky Liverpudlians (although it doesn’t contain the word “Liverpudlian,” which is one of those words you should use every chance you get), it really only scratches the surface of what this avant-pop art-school project has achieved in its 15-odd years of existence.

a.P.A.t.T. (what does it stand for? how do you pronounce it? who knows? who cares?) formed in Liverpool in 1997 or 1998. Their early goal, according to their Wikipedia page (which the band links to from their official site, so let’s assume it’s semi-accurate), was to “make, find, imagine, and create ‘secret music,’” by which they seemed to mean music that abandoned traditional song structures and instrumentation. You can hear some of the band’s early stuff on Welcome to a​.​P​.​A​.​t​.​T. Island – A collection of earlies, which veers sharply between abstract, ambient noise and bursts of spastic, genre-hopping art-pop that reveals some of those Mr. Bungle influences that Adam picked up, as well as an even more direct early influence (and another favorite of ours around here), Cardiacs.

By 2005 or so, the band’s music had become even harder to categorize. On the Fre(e.P), they started doing Girl Talk-like mashups, mixing recognizable pop and classic rock samples with trip-hop beats and trashy club rap, but doing it in a style meant more to be unsettling than party-starting. Check the amazing “Megamix Part 1″ for a taste of what happens when you cram the Jackson 5, Coolio, Portishead and “What a Day for a Daydream” into the same track.

Meanwhile, they were also developing a live soundtrack for the silent-film-era vampire classic, Nosferatu, complete with strings. Because hey, why not?

In 2008, they reinvented themselves yet again, transforming into a Zappa-like prog/jazz/metal/psych-rock orchestra on the epic, 27-track Black & White Mass. Most recently, they released Paul the Record, a split album with a band called Peepholes, then decided to embrace the “playlist on shuffle” mentality of our modern age with Ogadimma, a 14-track set on which no two songs are done in the same style. They’ve also shot videos for all 14 songs; taken collectively, they’re pretty amazing. Here they are, for example, in full-on Prince-meets-Of-Montreal mode:

Now try to remember, as you watch this next video, that this is the same band:

They also cite Ween as one of their influences, which honestly didn’t make sense to me until I heard the casual, tongue-in-cheek virtuosity of the Ogadimma stuff: “Oh, you want to hear us do some ’80s synth-pop? Sure, here you go. No big whoop.” (Among their other listed influences: The Residents, Duran Duran, Captain Beefheart, John Zorn, Slayer, Claude Debussy, ABBA, and The Beatles. Much like a.P.A.t.T.’s actual music, this list simultaneously makes no sense and all the sense in the world.)

You’ll notice up until now that I haven’t mentioned any of a.P.A.t.T.’s members by name. That’s because, quite frankly, I have no idea who these people are. a.P.A.t.T don’t perform wearing masks or anything, but they do (mostly) stick to an all-white costume palette that seems to help them maintain a semi-anonymous quality. That plus, let’s be honest here, a.P.A.t.T. is not the world’s most Google-friendly band name. According to their Wikipedia page, their core members go by the names General MIDI, Field Marshall Stack, Dorothy Wave, Master Fader and The Researcher, but that’s all I know.

Oh, did I mention that they sometimes perform site-specific works as a full fucking orchestra? Well, they do. If you want to hear them performing John Zorn and Steve Reich compositions, buy this.

We’ll wrap this post up with a clip of a.P.A.t.T’s live show (non-orchestra version), which looks like jolly good fun. That lady keyboard player (Dorothy Wave, we presume) has sure got some sick dance moves.

Links:

Godswounds

Godswounds

Say hello to our latest Weird Band Poll winners: Godswounds. They’re a bunch of hairy dudes from Australia who play a sort of math-rock/metal/dub/videogame-soundtrack combo featuring double drums, lots of choppy guitar, some trumpet and an instrument that sounds like a Theremin but I think is just some kind of vintage synth. They’re fun. They also have an excellent weird band pedigree: That’s Mr. Bungle‘s Danny Heifetz on one of the two drum kits and their latest album, Death to the Babyboomers, features members of The Melvins, Oxbow, Red Sparrowes and Sleepytime Gorilla Museum. Remember, kids: You’re never too weird to network.

You can stream all of Death to the Babyboomers on Bandcamp and even buy the whole thing for US $7 if you’re living large. Meantime, here’s an example of their live show, which takes awhile to get to Crazytown but makes up for lost time when it gets there. What’s Australian for “melt your fucking face off”? Sound is a little low, so crank it.

So congrats on winning the poll, Godswounds! And for the rest of y’all: Keep an eye out for our next poll in a couple weeks. It’s gonna be the most bonkers one yet, and I’m not just saying that because Andy beats me if we don’t get enough people voting.

Links:

Koenjihyakkei

Koenjihyakkei

Way back in 2009, when we were still a little ankle-biter of a blog, we wrote a post about a French band called Magma that spawned (the band, not the post) an entire genre of hyper-bizarre prog-rock/space-jazz/freak-fusion called Zeuhl. “Next time you hear a bunch of French dudes chanting nonsense lyrics over music that sounds sort of like Pat Metheny on acid,” we wrote, with that casual air of snark that only comes from having no idea what the fuck you’re talking about, “you’re probably listening to a Zeuhl band.”

Well, it’s taken us four years, but we’ve finally a.) admitted that, to this very day, we often have no idea what the fuck we’re talking about and b.) gotten around to writing about another Zeuhl band. Except this bunch is neither French nor, entirely, dudes. They’re from Japan and they’re a coed ensemble by the name of Koenjihyakkei, which translates to something like “The Hundred Sights of Koenji.” Koenji is a neighborhood in Tokyo, but does it really have a hundred sights? Beats me. Like I said, we often have no idea what the fuck we’re talking about.

Here’s what little we do know: Koenjihyakkei (also sometimes transliterated as “Koenji Hyakkei”) was started in the early ’90s by a drummer named Tatsuya Yoshida, whose previous band, Ruins, did a pretty fair approximation of Magma’s original Zeuhl insanity rendered down to just a bass/drums duo. Having apparently exhausted that format, Yoshida expanded his list of collaborators with Koenjihyakkei, adding a rotating cast of musicians to an increasingly epic and noisy take on Magma-esque jazz-prog mayhem. The band’s most recent lineup, seen in the above photo, features a lady who just goes by AH on vocals, Keiko Komori on reeds, Kengo Sakamoto on bass and Taku Yabuki on keys.

We also know that, sadly, the band appears to have been pretty inactive since about 2010 or so. Yoshida has been more focused on various new incarnations of Ruins: Ruins Alone, which is just him with a drum kit and electronics, and Sax Ruins, which is him with (you’ll never guess) a sax player. He’s also got a guitar/bass/drums power trio called Korekyojinn and a growing online photo archive called Stones of the World. Not pictures of international Rolling Stones cover bands—though that would indeed be awesome—but just pictures of interesting rock formations, made by both humans and nature. Worth a look, especially if you’re into stony things. Did I just make a really lame pot joke? Why, yes, yes I did. Thanks for noticing.

Koenjihyakkei’s music is difficult to describe, even for us. Is it Magma by way of Naked City? Boredoms by way of Shibushirazu Orchestra? Japanese show tunes as performed by “something so far off Broadway it’s on the moon”? (We didn’t come up with that last one, but it kinda sounds like something we would’ve written in 2009.) Whatever it is, it’s more overtly jazz-based than Magma or Ruins, but still prone to going off on the sort of crazy tangents that wouldn’t sound out of place in a Mike Patton side project.

We’ll leave you with two videos that should give you a sense of Koenjihyakkei’s full range of musical lunacy. The first is taken from their 2010 DVD Live at Koenji High and really showcases them (especially vocalist AH) as a sort of a jazz quintet from Mars. The oddly jaunty gang vocals at 2:50 are my favorite part. Also the part where she growls like a demon over some serious ’70s-style prog-rock synth runs. I’m not telling you where to find that part; you’ll just have to listen to the whole goddamned thing yourself.

Next: We would be remiss if we didn’t include the track that MVR (Most Valuable Reader) Stuart Johnson sent our way to introduce us to the awesomeness that is Koenjihyakkei. Thanks, Stuart! For a band that owes much of its existence to a single other band (i.e. Magma), Koenjihyakkei are about as original as it gets.

Links:

Classic Frank Zappa albums “Freak Out!” and “Over-Nite Sensation” getting the deluxe vinyl reissue treatment

Frank Zappa and the Mothers of Invention - Freak Out

Since regaining the rights to Frank Zappa‘s vast catalog, his heirs over at Zappa Records and Zappa Family Trust have wasted no time in finding new and creative ways to get his music out into the marketplace. Some moves, like selling CDs with a distribution license for $1,000 a pop, have struck us as a bit ill-conceived. But they’ve also put out some cool unreleased material and finally made his stuff available on iTunes, a long overdue boon to those of us who still quaintly insist of paying to download music instead of just listening to Pandora all day.

Even more quaintly, some of us still listen to music on big black pieces of vinyl—and now Zappa Records has those folks covered, too. Next month, they’ll be reissuing two classic Zappa albums on collector’s quality 180-gram vinyl: Freak Out!, the groundbreaking debut from Zappa’s band The Mothers of Invention, and another Mothers mind-bender, 1973′s Over-Nite Sensation, which celebrates its 40th anniversary this year. Damn, I feel old just typing that.

No word yet on the exact release date of these suckers, but keep an eye on the somewhat bewildering Zappa.com site for (hopefully) more info soon. Meantime, let’s play out this post with a golden Frank oldie from Freak Out!, shall we?

Pryapisme

pryapisme-sm

Can somebody explain to me what the fuck is going with France? I thought they all listened to Edith Piaf and Phoenix or some shit, but it turns out those stinky-cheese-eaters are churning out some of the weirdest music on the planet right now. Maybe all that stinky cheese gets you high or something.

Next up in our parade of French freakery: Pryapisme, an experimental prog-metal band…or maybe they’re an experi-metal prog-mental band. See how I did that? Anyway, they’re from some part of France called Clermont-Ferrand and they apparently sometimes play with our reigning Weirdest Band in the World, Igorrr. We don’t know much about them because most of their stuff is in French, but here’s their English bio:

Pryapisme is a band who doesn’t know how to write biography since 2000. After studying ninja, a re-conversion in the cons-expertise of technical equipment for a massive group of automotive, Pryapisme offers an avantgardist rereading of the works of Tolstoy, but with real pieces of pizza inside.

Yep, that’s the whole bio. The French bio is a little longer and contains phrases like “flatulences sonores” and “humour scatologique” so we’re pretty sure it’s not a direct translation. But Andy and I never studied French so we’re not sure. What’s French for “avantgardist”?

Anyway, they’ve apparently been around since 2000, but the only album we’ve been able to find by them is a 2010 joint called Rococo Holocaust. It’s available on Bandcamp and if you’re prone to seizures, I suggest you skip it. Unless you like music that changes genres every 15 seconds. In that case, by all means dive in.

Next month, Pryapisme releases a new album called Hyperblast Super Collider. So far they’ve only released two tracks from it, but both are definitely of the strap-in-and-hang-the-fuck-on variety. First up: Their epic, 9-minute, doom-metal/spazz-tronic version of “Night on Bald Mountain.” I cannot wait for someone to upload a Fantasia clip set to this shit. (If you can’t see the Soundcloud player below, click here.)

Next, here’s the video for a song called…save me, copy-paste!…”Un druide est giboyeux lorsqu’il se prend pour un neutrino.” It’s, um, I’m gonna say metalcore ska-funk? I don’t fucking know, dude, just make any epileptics leave the room and watch it.

Hyperblast Super Collider comes out April 1st on Apathia Records. The Pryapisme guys are calling it a “soundtrack to the 8-bit Catpocalypse.” I always knew cats were gonna bring about the end of civilization as we know it.

Oh, did I mention one of the tracks on Hyperblast Super Collider is called “Jon-bon-jon-boutros-boutros-boutros-bovi-miou-miou”?

I fucking love France. Who knew?

[Update: Hyperblast Super Collider is now available in the Amazon.com MP3 store for—last we checked—a mere US$6.99. We're now an Amazon Associate site, so if you click that link and buy it, you'll be supporting us as well as the band. It's a win-win! For more on how Amazon Associates works, visit our FAQs.]

Links:

Sebkha-Chott

sebkha-chott2

I have to admit, when we started this blog, I really did not think France would be in the running for Country With the Most Weird Music. I was pretty sure it would come down to a three-way tie between America (because we rule), Japan (because even their pop music is weird), and Norway (black metal!), with maybe some former Soviet Republic like Estonia as a dark horse candidate just because they were cut off from western culture for half the last century. But France is killing it, man. Between Igorrr, Rockets, Ghedalia Tarzantes, Magma and now Sebkha-Chott,  the Frogs are cranking out crazy sounds faster than blocks of stinky cheese.

Sebkha-Chott were recently brought to our attention by a reader named Sean Buckley. We really hope Sean becomes a regular around here, because Sebkha-Chott is fucking gold. It’s like if Frank Zappa, the Residents, John Zorn and Slipknot drank all the absinthe in Paris and started a Magma cover band. Only weirder than that.

There’s very little info on the web about Sebkha-Chott that isn’t in French and/or translated into English so bad it’s like performance art. Here’s how their Wikipedia page describes their live show:

The atmosphere in Sebkha-Chott’s show is quite particular: the absurd basement is such that the content might not be taken seriously, though, the audience sollicitation is so strong (especially when the audience doesn’t react spontaneously) that kind of an embarrassment or even mistrust might occur. Whatever might be the audience reactions, Sebkha-Chott’s Kourt lays on them to build the show. Each concert thus is a unique event, as neither the setlist, nor the speeches are defined by advance. Still, there are some never-changing things: the shows open on a triumphal incoming of the Kourt (since 2007), which quickly leads to Tyrant’s speech, and they end up on the death of every member of Sebkah-Chott’s Kourt, killed by the Tyrant, mainly.

Oh, I forgot to mention: This is one of those bands, like Magma (or GWAR, for you Americans who don’t know who the fuck Magma are), that has invented their own mythological backstory. Every member of the band plays a role in a made-up world called Ohreland:

The “Tyrant” is Wladimir Ohrelianov II, who also plays six-string bass and does most of the vocals…although in past incarnations, they had additional vocalists with names like Mustach’Man, Cap’n Roses and Hrabe Black Sebbath.

The sort of combination executioner/court jester is Souv Ponky Ponk, who plays sax and occasionally sings in unintelligible gibberish…or it might just be French with a really, really weird accent—what do we know?.

Then there’s the excellently named Yüla Slipobitch, who is some kind of combination prostitute/dominatrix/second-in-command to Wladimir the Tyrant…oh, and she plays drums, machines and “tubular bells,” which we always thought was just the name of a particularly ridiculous prog-rock album but is apparently also, at least in France, an actual instrument.

Over the years, they’ve had various other members, all of whose actual identities remain a secret. Our favorite one is Tupac Promo, who we think might be a puppet and speaks something called “Moron Language.” Which is probably easier to understand than French.

Each performance by Sebkha-Chott is a “stopover” by visitors from the planet Ohreland. Sometimes the visitors from Ohreland don’t arrive all at once; sometimes they take over mid-show. Here’s an example.

As freaky as that was, the band’s latest video tops it by approximately five gajillion miles or so. I know it’s 15 minutes long, but watch the whole thing and I swear you will not be disappointed.

Oh, one last nice detail: Sebkha-Chott record all their music, artwork, videos and stage projections using open source software and release all their shit for free under something called a free art license. So yes, you can download all five of their albums for free from various sources. Here’s their latest one, which is called Ne[XXX]t Epilog. [Note: That link has been updated, at the personal request of Tupac Promo...see his comment below. We don't wanna burn in hell, Tupac.]

Links:

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 237 other followers